Special Abilities and Their Symptoms

Each individual is amazing and at Step By Step, each of the people who walk through our doors, show us how amazing they really are. Each one teaches us how their world is and allows us to enter that beautiful place to be able to work better with each person: children, mothers and fathers, grandparents, friends, teachers, babysitters and all who support special people that seek therapy at Step By Step.

Below is a brief description of special abilities that we love to work with:

Autism
Asperger
Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)
Down Syndrome
Tourette Syndrome (TS)
Cerebral palsy (CP)
Rett Syndrome (RS)


AUTISM

 

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a developmental disability that can cause significant social, communication and behavioral challenges. There is often nothing about how people with ASD look that sets them apart from other people, but people with ASD may communicate, interact, behave, and learn in ways that are different from most other people. The learning, thinking, and problem-solving abilities of people with ASD can range from gifted to severely challenged. Some people with ASD need a lot of help in their daily lives; others need less.

A diagnosis of ASD now includes several conditions that used to be diagnosed separately: autistic disorder, pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS), and Asperger syndrome. These conditions are now all called autism spectrum disorder.”
(https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/autism/facts.html)

More about ASD
Signs and Symptoms


ASPEGER

“Asperger syndrome is one of several previously separate subtypes of autism that were folded into the single diagnosis autism spectrum disorder (ASD) with the publication of the DSM-5 diagnostic manual in 2013.

Asperger syndrome was generally considered to be on the “high functioning” end of the spectrum. Affected children and adults have difficulty with social interactions and exhibit a restricted range of interests and/or repetitive behaviors. Motor development may be delayed, leading to clumsiness or uncoordinated motor movements. Compared with those affected by other forms of ASD, however, those with Asperger syndrome do not have significant delays or difficulties in language or cognitive development. Some even demonstrate precocious vocabulary – often in a highly specialized field of interest.”
(https://www.autismspeaks.org/what-autism/asperger-syndrome)

More information about Asperger Syndrome


ATTENTION-DEFICIT / HYPERACTIVITY DISORDER (ADHD)

“ADHD is one of the most common neurodevelopmental disorders of childhood. It is usually first diagnosed in childhood and often lasts into adulthood. Children with ADHD may have trouble paying attention, controlling impulsive behaviors (may act without thinking about what the result will be), or be overly active.

Signs and Symptoms

It is normal for children to have trouble focusing and behaving at one time or another. However, children with ADHD do not just grow out of these behaviors. The symptoms continue and can cause difficulty at school, at home, or with friends.

A child with ADHD might:

– daydream a lot
– forget or lose things a lot
– squirm or fidget
– talk too much
– make careless mistakes or take unnecessary risks
– have a hard time resisting temptation
– have trouble taking turns
– have difficulty getting along with others”
(https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/adhd/facts.html)

More information about ADHD
Signs and Symptoms


DOWN SYNDROME

“Down syndrome is a condition in which a person has an extra chromosome. Chromosomes are small “packages” of genes in the body. They determine how a baby’s body forms during pregnancy and how the baby’s body functions as it grows in the womb and after birth. Typically, a baby is born with 46 chromosomes. Babies with Down syndrome have an extra copy of one of these chromosomes, chromosome 21. A medical term for having an extra copy of a chromosome is ‘trisomy.’ Down syndrome is also referred to as Trisomy 21. This extra copy changes how the baby’s body and brain develop, which can cause both mental and physical challenges for the baby.”
(https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/birthdefects/downsyndrome.html)

More information about Down syndrome



TOURETTE SYNDROME

“Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a condition of the nervous system. TS causes people to have “tics”.

Tics are sudden twitches, movements, or sounds that people do repeatedly. People who have tics cannot stop their body from doing these things. For example, a person might keep blinking over and over again. Or, a person might make a grunting sound unwillingly.

Having tics is a little bit like having hiccups. Even though you might not want to hiccup, your body does it anyway. Sometimes people can stop themselves from doing a certain tic for awhile, but it’s hard. Eventually the person has to do the tic.

Types of Tics

There are two types of tics—motor and vocal:

Motor Tics

Motor tics are movements of the body. Examples of motor tics include blinking, shrugging the shoulders, or jerking an arm.

Vocal Tics

Vocal tics are sounds that a person makes with his or her voice. Examples of vocal tics include humming, clearing the throat, or yelling out a word or phrase.

Tics can be either simple or complex:

Simple Tics

Simple tics involve just a few parts of the body. Examples of simple tics include squinting the eyes or sniffing.

Complex Tics

Complex tics usually involve several different parts of the body and can have a pattern. An example of a complex tic is bobbing the head while jerking an arm, and then jumping up.

More information about Tourette syndrome

Go to the top of this page
Back To English Menu



CEREBRAL PALSY

Cerebral palsy (CP) is a group of disorders that affect a person’s ability to move and maintain balance and posture. CP is the most common motor disability in childhood. Cerebral means having to do with the brain. Palsy means weakness or problems with using the muscles. CP is caused by abnormal brain development or damage to the developing brain that affects a person’s ability to control his or her muscles.

The symptoms of CP vary from person to person. A person with severe CP might need to use special equipment to be able to walk, or might not be able to walk at all and might need lifelong care. A person with mild CP, on the other hand, might walk a little awkwardly, but might not need any special help. CP does not get worse over time, though the exact symptoms can change over a person’s lifetime.

All people with CP have problems with movement and posture. Many also have related conditions such as intellectual disability; seizures; problems with vision, hearing, or speech; changes in the spine (such as scoliosis); or joint problems (such as contractures).

Go to the top of this page
Back To English Menu


RETT SYNDROME

Rett syndrome is a childhood neurodevelopmental disorder that affects females almost exclusively.  The child generally appears to grow and develop normally, before symptoms begin.  Loss of muscle tone is usually the first symptom. Other early symptoms may include a slowing of development, problems crawling or walking, and diminished eye contact. As the syndrome progresses, a child will lose purposeful use of her hands and the ability to speak. Compulsive hand movements such as wringing and washing follow the loss of functional use of the hands. The inability to perform motor functions is perhaps the most severely disabling feature of Rett syndrome, interfering with every body movement, including eye gaze and speech.
(https://www.ninds.nih.gov/Disorders/All-Disorders/Rett-Syndrome-Information-Page)

More information about Rett Syndrome

Go to the top of this page
Back To English Menu